There is a phase of ‘El Niño– Southern Oscillation’ (ENSO), which refers to variations in the temperature of the surface of the tropical eastern Pacific Ocean and in air surface pressure in the tropical western Pacific. The two variations are coupled: the warm oceanic phase, El Niño, accompanies high air surface pressure in the western Pacific, while the cold phase, La Niña, accompanies low air surface pressure in the western Pacific.[2][3] Mechanisms that cause the oscillation remain under study.

El Niño (/ɛlˈnnj//ˈnɪn/Spanish pronunciation: [el ˈniɲo]) is a band of warm ocean water temperatures that periodically develops off the Pacific coast of South America, El Niño is defined by prolonged warming in the Pacific Ocean sea surface temperatures when compared with the average value.

The Southern Oscillation is the atmospheric component of El Niño. This component is an oscillation in surface air pressure between the tropical eastern and the western Pacific Ocean waters. The strength of the Southern Oscillation is measured by the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI). The SOI is computed from fluctuations in the surface air pressure difference betweenTahiti and Darwin, Australia.[8] El Niño episodes are associated with negative values of the SOI, meaning there is below normal pressure over Tahiti and above normal pressure of Darwin.

The studies of historical data show the recent El Niño variation is most likely linked to global warming. For example, one of the most recent results, even after subtracting the positive influence of decadal variation, is shown to be possibly present in the ENSO trend,[51] the amplitude of the ENSO variability in the observed data still increases, by as much as 60% in the last 50 years.[52]

The exact changes happening to ENSO in the future is uncertain:[53] Different models make different predictions.[54][55] It may be that the observed phenomenon of more frequent and stronger El Niño events occurs only in the initial phase of the global warming, and then (e.g., after the lower layers of the ocean get warmer, as well), El Niño will become weaker than it was.[56] It may also be that the stabilizing and destabilizing forces influencing the phenomenon will eventually compensate for each other.[57] More research is needed to provide a better answer to that question. The ENSO is considered to be a potential tipping element in Earth’s climate.[58

 

 

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