Four Ways to Ask Questions Like a Leader — Leadership Freak

Curiosity takes you further than knowledge. The bottleneck in the room is the leader who has all the answers when there are competent people at the table. Telling is easy. If you doubt this idea, try asking three questions before making one statement. The best questions: #1. Have slow answers. Ordinary questions garner quick responses. […]

via Four Ways to Ask Questions Like a Leader — Leadership Freak

In Reality Mr. Spock Couldn’t Make the Simplest Decision — Leadership Freak

Only 30% of individual behavior is rational — the other 70% is emotional. (The Gallop 2017 Global Emotions report – registration required for free download.) Mr. Spock: Logic is only part of decision-making. The other part is feelings. Mr. Spock wouldn’t be able to make a simple decision. Antonio Damasio studied a business person named Elliot […]

via In Reality Mr. Spock Couldn’t Make the Simplest Decision — Leadership Freak

Dear Dan: How can I Lead Procrastinators — Leadership Freak

Dear Dan, How can I better lead procrastinators? Sincerely, Tired of Waiting Dear Tired, I can’t figure out why people procrastinate. After reflection, I confess that I do it. But it’s still stressful when people on my team procrastinate. Perhaps you’ve procrastinated when it comes to dealing with procrastinators. Principle #1: Procrastination in others is […]

via Dear Dan: How can I Lead Procrastinators — Leadership Freak

How Experts Become Idiots and Leaders Become Blockheads — Leadership Freak

The trouble with ignorance is it’s easy to spot in others. I can predict your future with one question, “What are you learning?” If you’re a blockhead, buckle up for more of the same. If you’re learning, the future will be different from the past. We flounder in the blindness of perceived knowledge. Idiots and […]

via How Experts Become Idiots and Leaders Become Blockheads — Leadership Freak

Ganesh Chaturthi

Multicultural Events

Ganesh Chaturthi Celebrations

Ganesha Chaturthi, the great Ganesha festival, also known as ‘Vinayak is celebrated by Hindus around the world as the birthday of Lord Ganesha. It is observed during the Hindu month of Bhadra (mid-August to mid-September) and the grandest and most elaborate of them, especially in the western India state of Maharashtra, lasts for 10 days, ending on the day of ‘Ananta Chaturdashi’.

             Why We Celebrate Ganesh Festival?

It is not known when and how Ganesh Chaturthi was first celebrated. Ganesh festival was being celebrated as a public event in Pune since the times of Shivaji (1630–1680), the founder of the Maratha Empire. The Peshwas, the de facto hereditary administrators of the Empire from 1749 till its end in 1818, encouraged the celebrations in their administrative seat Pune as Ganesha was their family deity (Kuladevata).With the fall of the Peshwas, Ganesh festival lost state patronage and became a private family celebration again in Maharashtra till its revival by Indian freedom fighter and social reformer Lokmanya Tilak.

The public festival as celebrated in Maharashtra today, was introduced by Bhausaheb Laxman Javale in 1892 by installing first Sarvajanik (Public) Ganesh idol. This followed a meeting at his residence, which was attended by, amongst others, Balasaheb Natu, and Krishnajipant Khasgiwale. Khasgiwale on his visit to the Maratha ruled princely state of Gwalior had seen the tradition of public celebration still maintained and brought it to the attention of his friends in Pune.In 1893 Lokmanya Tilak praised the concept of Sarvajanik Ganesh Utsav in his newspaper, Kesari, and the next year he installed a Ganesh idol in Kesari Wada too. Tilak’s efforts transformed the annual domestic festival into a large, well-organized public event.Tilak recognized the wide appeal of the deity Ganesha as “the god for everybody”, and popularized Ganesh Chaturthi as a national festival in order “to bridge the gap between Brahmins and ‘non-Brahmins’ and find a context in which to build a new grassroots unity between them”, and generate nationalistic fervour among people in Maharashtra against the British colonial rule.Tilak was the first to install large public images of Ganesh in pavilions, and also established the practice of submerging the idols in rivers, sea, or other pools of water on the tenth day after Ganesh Chaturthi.

Under Tilak’s encouragement, the festival facilitated community participation and involvement in the form of intellectual discourses, poetry recitals, performances of plays, musical concerts, and folk dances. It served as a meeting ground for people of all castes and communities in times when, in order to exercise control over the population, the British discouraged social and political gatherings.

Written & Edited by Ameya Kale, Leo Edunomics Team!

Supposition & Presupposition

The compass of leadership runs to & forth from suppositions to pre-suppositions.

If Supposition is Law , then Pre – Supposition?

With every question emerges a startup with an idea which is a pre- supposition.

Leadership is a churn, leadership is perspective, leadership is the accelerator the catalyst.

Again, bringing back the suppositions & pre-suppositions, emerges the importance of an idea, with a compass for the direction.

Direction from & direction to inclusive of the suppositions & pre-suppositions.

Marketing to Market again suppositions to pre- suppositions, leadership to market to exist to co- exist.

Market momentum to parallel to lateral to linear thinking, suppositions to pre-suppositions via digital platform creation of leadership existence.

Leadership in itself is a pre-supposition, of presumptions & assumptions, contextual as well as upfront.

Contextual as well as upfront again a supposition & a pre-supposition.

 

Entrepreneurship Education

Rediscovering Enterprise

Perhaps the phenomenon we are witnessing now has less to do with action or risk-taking than with the simple observation that people, not institutions, create economic wealth. A Rediscovery of business as a process limited only by the boundaries of each individuals intelligence, imagination,energy & daring.

e_ed

A Preliminary Historiography of the Brazil’s Landless Laborers’ Movement (MST) Cliff Welch

Like many politicians, Brazilian president Luis Inácio Lula da Silva identified himself with different citizens by dressing like them. He seemed to delight in donning an Indian headdress or squeezing into a hard hat. Such images fit the populist message of this remarkable man, a man who rose from poverty to become leader of the labor movement that challenged the military dictatorship and helped restore democracy to Brazil, the world’s eighth largest economy. But in July 2003 when Lula placed the bright red cap of the Landless Laborers’ Movement (Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem Terra [MST]) on his head, all hell broke loose. Subsequent editions of nearly every news vehicle in the country featured alarmed criticism of this fateful act. Words like “rebellious,” “revolutionary” and “irresponsible” characterized the reaction as dozens of reporters were sent to the field to document the dangers posed to the country by the MST. The controversy reached the United States, where concerns on Wall Street and in Washington threatened to undermine Brazil’s fragile credit rating and international standing. By 2004, the Lula administration had carefully finessed most of the criticisms, supporting the right of the MST to mobilize and pressure the government while simultaneously investing in a conflicting agribusiness development scheme.

What is the MST? In contradistinction to the image projected by the Brazilian press, the collection of recently published books reviewed here describe it as an institutionalized social movement of unprecedented significance for Brazil and the world that does not pose an immediate revolutionary threat to society. On one book’s jacket, Eric Hobsbawm, a frequent traveler to Brazil, validates the MST as “the most ambitious social movement in contemporary Latin America” (Branford and Rocha 2002). On another’s cover, journalist Studs Terkel describes the MST as “a million or so ordinary people fighting for the right to live ordinary lives” (Wright and Wolford 2003). Founded in 1984, the MST fights for radical agrarian reform—that is, state intervention to reverse historic land concentration trends, distribute good agricultural land to needy workers, and reallocate resources to support small and cooperative farming as fundamental to the development of a stronger, more democratic and just society.

Today, the MST boasts a membership of more than 500,000 families—at least two million people—and has a presence in every state and more than 700 municipalities. The MST runs some 500 farm co-ops in the areas of production, marketing, credit, and technical assistance. It trains most of its own technicians, militants, and leaders. It has succeeded in redirecting government funds to support its administration of 1,800 elementary schools with more than 160,000 students, teaching basic literacy to 30,000 teenagers and adults, and operating a college. In the meantime, some sixty members are studying in Cuba to be doctors (MST 2004).

%d bloggers like this: